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leather shapes leather shapes

KINGSMERE CRAFTS

HAND-CRAFTED LEATHER GOODS

Cross stitch

This one barely limps across the line to qualify as a decorative stitch. Even then there will not be many articles that are considered suitable for it to be used on. To make the best of it if you do use it then make sure the lacing holes are spaced further apart than you'd normally think of as the appropriate distance while at the same time being in slightly more from the edge. Having said that, this stitch is quite suitable to use with very soft leathers that have a tendency to tear easily, such as the belly parts of basil (From the Arabic bîtana, from which the Provençal bazana and the French basane were derived, "basil" is a leather made using small hides, mostly sheepskins and tanned with agents of 100% plant origin. Other leathers, traditionally tanned using alum, fade in the sun, whereas basil tans in the sun, being tanned with agents of plant origin. This particular feature gave rise to the French word basané used to describe olive complexions!)  However, it is not at all to be used on very thin skins. Whatever the article the amount of lace you'll need is five or six times the length to be covered.
 

Beginning with the illustration in Figs 1 you can see this stitch is to be be done using a single length of lace with a needle at each end, and that half the lace is on either side of the leather. Usually when using a needle in each hand the job should be held in a saddler's clamp to keep the hands free.

Have a look at Fig. 2. You can see that you will be bringing one end of the lace through. Now when you look at Fig. 3 you can see that the needle will be inclined to pull away from the lace if any great pressure is applied, so to avoid this you can use the lacing fid to enlarge the hole slightly before putting the needle through. It is obvious when you look at Fig. 4 that stitching continues in the same fashion. Having now reached Fig. 5 observe that you have to go through the corner holes a couple of extra times to give added strength.
 

When finishing up, as shown in Fig. 6, bring the two ends up between the layers of leather and carry them back for a few loops. Finally we get to Fig. 7,  here we tighten the loops, pulling the ends taut, before cutting them off flush. The final illustration shows how the finished article, all being well, should look.
 


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