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leather shapes leather shapes

KINGSMERE CRAFTS

HAND-CRAFTED LEATHER GOODS

Hand-crafted, and decorative leatherwork. How is it done? - continued

Binding edges - continued

Where non-vegetable-tanned leather has an advantage is in its ability to have its edges turned under. Almost always the edges will need to be skived to make it easier to fold over, and even for going round corners or curves, to be notched, but it is the simplest edge finish for non-vegetable-tanned leathers. Also, where some firmness or thickness is required, double-turned edges are a good solution, but if less thickness is needed one edge can have its turn-under bit trimmed off or be pared away to virtually almost no thickness.

edge notched

turned edge

Edge notched to go round curve

Turned edge

Double turned edge

Should a non-vegetable-tanned leather edge require binding or strengthening there are a couple of simple ways to go about it that serves these purposes, as can be seen in the self-explanatory illustrations below.

single edge binding

turned edge, reduced thickness

edge strengthening

Simple edge binding

Turned edge but reducing thickness

Simple edge strengthening method

The parts of the article you are making where you apply either of these methods has to be your choice, according to the circumstances, as to being the most suitable to use at the time, bearing in mind the article's intended use and probable wear and tear over a given period.

divider

Tent Seams:- Roman tents were sewn with several distinctive seams which are designed to be waterproof, and which may be useful on other items as well. Figures 1 and 2 show the two steps in sewing the reinforced or welt seam. First the two pieces are laid grain sides together and a narrow strip called a welt is laid along the edge, projecting beyond it. All three layers are sewn together with a 2-needle stitch. Then the outer layer is turned up and the free edge of the welt is sewn to its flesh side with tunnel stitches, meaning that the needle goes into the flesh side and back out again without ever coming through the outer grain side. Either a whip stitch or a running stitch may be used to secure the welt. When properly done there are no holes through the leather, and water runs off without getting into the seam. Shown below is a drawing of the inside of a welt seam, with a whip stitch at the edge of the welt.

 Figure 3 shows a wide reinforced seam, similar to the welt seam but the welt is wider and tunnel-stitched down along both edges. While Fig 4 is a bound seam usually constructed at the corners of tents.
 


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